Hugo Hoppmann
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V.U.C.A. Magazine

 
Project: V.U.C.A. Magazine

V.U.C.A. (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous) is a self-made magazine on architecture, design and interior with the theme ETHNO vs. MODERN in collaboration with photographer Namsa Leuba.

The magazine collects a radical mixture of photography and in-depth interviews and is thoroughly designed in the V.U.C.A. Grotesque typeface.
(Thanks: François Rappo, Pierre Fantys)

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What’s this publication? Is it a gallery for compiled work, an artist book, a means to reproduce someone else’s thoughts, an effort to share your own?
The V.U.C.A. magazine was a student project created in the summer semester 2010 at ECAL. It’s a collaboration between photographer Namsa Leuba and graphic designer Hugo Hoppmann. The issue’s concept is titled ETHNO vs. MODERN underlining a particular interest in all kinds of contrasts — both conceptually and aesthetically. This shows not only in the extensive photo series and interviews (e.g. with industrial designers who crafted a special series of chairs for the occasion) but also in the details such as the custom V.U.C.A. typeface which was used throughout the whole issue.

How did you derive at the title V.U.C.A? Can you elaborate?
V.U.C.A. is a military term describing a certain situation or object that is “Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous” — this became an important part to the direction of the project. I first found this term in the 032c magazine where I was working in early 2010. I then also produced a sans-serif typeface named “V.U.C.A. Grotesque” as the term somehow perfectly reflected both the typeface and the magazine.

Was there a print run for V.U.C.A? Are you planning to produce another issue or was this a one-off project?
There was only a very limited printrun as it was a student project and not officially published. Namsa and me are (fortunately) pretty busy at the moment … but who knows what the future brings!
Altough the project was initially a student “only” project there was always a very professional working atmosphere throughout the whole process. The teachers were very hard clients so to say. In this project the most important thing was the learning factor which of course evolved in the process, the errors, and all the things seen, heard, and felt along the way. Finally it helped us to better understand the relationship between art director/graphic designer/photographer.

In terms of inspiration, what references do you draw from?
At that time 032c was a big inspiration for us … the stark contrasts, the bold colors the balance between high and low culture … curiously enough I’m now helping to design the magazine myself at Meiré und Meiré.

What are you hoping for people to take away with them when they view your work?
The best thing you can do with a project like this is to inspire and motivate ohter people for their own work!

(From an interview with ANOTHER AFRICA)

 
Hugo Hoppmann